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Supercharge your pantry, fridge and freezer + four recipes

Written by Lee on . Posted in anti-inflammatory, Blog, Blog Dinner, Blog Lunch, Gluten Free, gut health, Heal Your Gut, intermittent fasting, Organic, Seasonal, Spotlight On, Vegetarian, Wheat Free, Yeast Free

Have you noticed a lot more articles popping up about food waste and frugal living and the effects it can have on healthy eating?  Me too....so I today figured I’d share my thoughts on eating well on a budget. It is possible!

Being thrifty doesn’t mean we need to compromise on health or taste.  Often, frugality means not splurging on organic groceries and choosing the home brand when it comes to stocking up on necessities because their organic counterparts are jaw-droppingly expensive. But, eating well shouldn’t be expensive or difficult. Food is part of our everyday lives so it’s important to make eating well as easy and enjoyable as possible!  

Whether you’re a meat-eater, flexitarian, keto lover, paleo, vegetarian, vegan or somewhere in between, there is a way that healthy eating can work for everyone. 

So, how do we begin?

Let’s start in the kitchen, by supercharging your pantry, fridge and freezer!

Every Sunday morning, I take stock of what I have in my kitchen. I then make a list of the ingredients I need to buy so I can use up what’s already in there. If you're on a budget it helps to do a quick price comparison and check the prices at your supermarket or local grocer and think about bulk options that are available in your area.

With the busy lives that most of us lead, we tend to do many of our tasks online. We catch up with our friends online, shop for clothes online, order products online, and now, we can do our groceries online!

Sometimes, online grocery shopping can be even cheaper than your usual store and as an added bonus, it's delivered straight to your door. How easy is that?  For busy people, (working moms and dads I’m looking at you!) switching over to online shopping means you'll also avoid the hustle and bustle of the supermarket.  Plus, online stores often have special offers so keep an eye out for them. 

Depending on how often you cook and how many people you're food shopping and prepping for, you might find it worthwhile to invest in an annual membership at stores such as Sprout Market which allow you to buy natural groceries at cheaper prices. Who doesn’t love a bargain?

When I'm cooking, I like to cook simple recipes from scratch and use natural foods, herbs and a range of oils such as olive and avocado which are great for seasoning a variety of foods. When you cook yourself, you avoid buying ready-made foods which can often be loaded with unwanted ingredients and lacking in taste. So the trick to economise is,  supercharge your pantry and use economically-friendly ingredients, then choose simple recipes that make meals last the distance.  To get into this flow, all it takes is a little upfront planning.  Today I'm going to share four recipes that really go the distance from my eBook The Renewable Table, a way of eating that produces less food waste, saves money and is healthier than the average convenience meal. I call it continuum cooking.

Like good wine and cheese, some foods only get better with age (but not too much age!). Foods that improve with taste the following day have an important commonality; they consist of a multitude of herbs, spices and ingredients that add loads of flavour to a dish – think onions, garlic and peppers! Yum! 

Here is how I like to supercharge my pantry fridge and freezer with the basics so I always have options on hand to create quick, easy and affordable meals.

Herbs and spices

Keep a wide range of herbs and spices lined up in your pantry to lend a punch of flavours to your dishes. Adding an alluring blend of your favourite herbs and spices will ensure your dishes taste even better a day or even three after you’ve prepared them.

The herbs and spices you keep on hand will depend upon your particular tastes and preferences. Start by looking through the recipes that spark your interest and check to see which flavours you’ll need. They all add a delicious aroma to your meal in addition to loading your dish up with health- promoting properties. These are some of my favourite herbs and spices:

Always stock some good quality sea salt or pink Himalayan salt, which you’ll find packed full of minerals to add even more nutrition and great flavour to your cooking.

Flavour providers

Onions and garlic both from the Allium family are two of my favourite flavour accompaniments to use in cooking. Onions and garlic don’t just play an important culinary role; they also contain a plethora of health benefits.

When you start by sautéing onion or garlic at the beginning of your cooking, you’ll find they’ll unleash a powerful flavour that lends itself to releasing the aromas of other ingredients in your dish.

When continuum cooking, this is a really important first step, as the strong flavour combinations will only increase the longer you wait to eat it. This is perfect for renewable dishes you plan on reheating in a few days’ time.

Both onions and garlic can play a vital role in protecting your immune system and keeping you feeling strong and well. Onions can reduce the symptoms of bronchitis and the common cold. Garlic has antibacterial and antifungal properties that can strengthen your immune system overall, making you less vulnerable to contracting infections.

Some of my favourite flavour providers:

Grains and Staples

An absolute staple, grains, are one of the most affordable ingredients you can add to any meal of the day. Use grains and seeds such as brown rice, quinoa, and quinoa flakes to create hearty and nourishing dishes.

Each one of these grains and seeds is versatile, budget- friendly and last for months, sealed in a jar in your pantry, alleviating the need for excess waste.

When reheating renewable meals, add some brown or green rice to bulk up the dish, allowing it to serve a larger group of people whilst at the same time, becoming even more affordable. Both brown and green rice are full of fibre and a great way to satisfy your tummy when you’re famished or in need of an injection of B vitamins.

Re-purposing last night’s roast meat or vegetables into a fried rice is super-fast and makes for a tasty and convenient work lunch.

Quinoa has become more popular over the last few years and is one of the more affordable and versatile ‘powerfoods’ of today. One of my favourite renewable sequences that you’ll enjoy going on a culinary adventure with is my garlic and lemony chicken roast, and then the following day, turning the uneaten portions into a chicken quinoa meal with roast vegetables.

Supercharged Tip: Be sure to soak your quinoa the night before. This century-old process of soaking helps to break down the anti-nutrients and hard-to-digest components of the seed to avoid tummy upsets or bloating.

Buckwheat is another grain that has become popular in recent times and is a scrumptious alternative to rice or made into porridge for a warming winter breakfast. Diets that contain buckwheat have been linked to lowered risk of developing high cholesterol and high blood pressure. If you’re feeling adventurous, try scattering some activated buckwheat grains over your berries or yoghurt to add to your daily nutrient needs and for added texture.

On a cold winter’s morning, creating porridge with oats is a perfect way to start the day. Affordable, tasty and tremendously satisfying, oats are high in fibre and a perfect way to ensure the family are ready and alert for an energised day ahead.

If you’re gluten intolerant, you may find discomfort with ordinary oats, so look for the gluten-free oats or use organic quinoa flakes, to ensure your tummy has a pleasured experience and not an excruciating one.

Tinned Tomatoes

From pasta sauces, to vegetable bakes, soups to casseroles, there’s no limit to what trusted tinned tomatoes can do for your kitchen.

Adding a richness of flavour to your meal, tinned tomatoes are a versatile and low-calorie product imperative to have on hand in your pantry.

When transforming a roast into a stew, or converting unused vegetables into pasta, tinned tomatoes and tomato puree are essential for simple and budget-friendly continuum cooking.

Dressings, oils and vinegars

To add some instant flavour and bring your ingredients together, maintain a few basic dressings, oils and vinegar. Start with wheat free tamari, apple cider vinegar and extra virgin olive oil.

Wheat free tamari is a thicker, less salty, fermented soy sauce and can be used in Asian and non-Asian cooking to add a full, savoury, umami flavour to your dishes.

Originally used as a food preservative, vinegar is a must-have condiment in your kitchen to add flavour and an acidic balance to your dish. Apple cider vinegar, different to apple cider is delicious as a marinade or salad dressing, and is known for its vast list of medicinal benefits, including balancing blood sugar levels, promoting heart health, aiding weight loss, supporting digestion and providing an energy boost.

Try adding two tbsp of apple cider vinegar to 1⁄4 cup extra virgin olive oil, crushed garlic and pinch of sea salt as a delightful dressing to drizzle over your next salad or vegetable dish.

Extra virgin olive oil is a necessity in a renewable kitchen and you may find yourself using this tasty condiment daily.

The “extra virgin” refers to the oil being of the highest quality and usually has to pass a large number of tests and meet a range of strict standards to be classed as extra virgin. It should be produced by olives that are disease-free, harvested at the right time and processed immediately.

Extra virgin olive oil is completely natural, very high in antioxidants and contains anti-inflammatory qualities, making it a nutritious addition to your dish. Plus it tastes so rich and charming; no wonder the Italians add it to everything!

Other Dressings and Oils I'm loving at the moment include: 

Seeds and nuts

Nuts and seeds are some of the most versatile ingredients, adding a rich flavour to your sweet or savoury recipe. When creating a renewable table, the addition of nuts or seeds can transform the texture of your next meal while adding a boost of nutrients to help you meet your daily nutrition quota. They also taste great on their own as a cheeky little nibble.

Keep on hand almonds, hazelnuts, cashews, pecans, walnuts, pine nuts and pistachios. Each of these nuts contain essential good fats that promote skin and heart health and are a good source of plant-based protein.

If you haven’t experimented much with seeds, try chia and flax seeds. Sprinkle chia seeds over your breakfast parfait, or simply scatter over a fruit salad for some added protein and fibre.

When handling flax seeds (sometimes referred to as linseeds) you can eat them whole, sprinkling over your breakfast or using them to create homemade muesli bars – a great afternoon snack for the kids. 

Another way to consume flaxseeds is by blending them into a meal, or you can buy the flaxseed meal already blended at your local supermarket or health food store; this is a handy grain-free ingredient for creating breads and muffins.

Nut and seed butters are becoming more popular and are a tasty and nutritious spread to add to biscuits or for dipping vegetable sticks. A favourite of mine is tahini, which is made from ground sesame seeds. You can purchase hulled or unhulled tahini; however the unhulled version is more nutrient-rich, with more than ten times the amount of calcium.

Other nuts and seeds I'm loving:

Non-Dairy Milks

For those who are dairy intolerant or looking to reduce dairy intake, start celebrating for the vast selection of non-dairy milks now available. A natural nut milk or oat milk is a delightful non-dairy option to add to your breakfast muesli or porridge. If you want an extra treat, I'm going nuts over hazelnut chocolate milk and the almond-chocolate milk. If you’re extra handy in the kitchen, make your own!

Natural sweeteners

An alternative to refined sugar or artificial sweeteners, natural sweeteners like rice malt syrup or raw honey, are the perfect solution to satisfy your sweet tooth whilst protecting your waistline.

Creating fun recipes like my Coconut Banana Bread will enable you to stay on track and avoid binge eating or ice cream remorse that can often accompany a overdose of processed sweet stuff.

After a natural sweetener with zero calories? Try stevia, which is a sugar substitute extracted from the leaves of the plant species stevia. Add a pinch of stevia to your tea or in place of other sweeteners while creating sweet treats. As stevia is much sweeter than natural sugar, you only need to use a fraction of stevia. For example, for every tsp of sugar, you only need a pinch of stevia. Taste as you go, and then add more according to your liking. If stevia's not your thing, coconut sugar and coconut syrup are a great alternative. 

Fresh vs. Frozen 

Contrary to popular belief, 'fresh produce' doesn’t always necessarily mean it’s really fresh. The fresh fruits and vegetables you buy at your local supermarket may already be a week old by the time they put on display. If you don’t have access to a farmer’s market nearby, it’s not a bad idea to opt for frozen. Whilst the texture might not be the greatest, frozen produce might sometimes be even healthier because they are frozen immediately which locks in all the essential nutrients.

You get home from work hungry and tired, and there are no fresh ingredients in the refrigerator but you want to eat something right away. Your first thought might be what’s the number to order in?

The perfect solution is to have a couple of packets of snap frozen vegetables in your freezer. Stock up on edamame peas, spinach, broccoli and green beans. They’ll come in handy when you need a quick healthy bite.

Then all you need to do is fling open the doors of your pantry and add your choice of pulses and tinned tomatoes or a pre-made sauce, and voila! You have everything you need to create a nutritious dinner that takes just minutes to prepare.

Frozen berries

A final must-have for your freezer is frozen berries. Anti-oxidant rich berries assist with aiding weight loss, diabetes management, and lowering blood pressure. Loaded with vitamin C, berries can protect with health of collagen, promote radiant skin and healthy hair, and may reduce the risk of cataracts, arthritis and macular degeneration.

Apart from the extensive list of health benefits, you’ll find yourself eating berries simply because they taste so sweet and satisfying.

Fresh berries are delicious, however if you know you have a busy week and may run the risk of wasting those sweet fruits, keeping frozen berries on hand gives you that sense of security knowing you won’t have a wastage situation on your hands.

Frozen berries are a convenient solution for an uplifting smoothie or a refreshing breakfast idea, scattering berries over a granola or yogurt. Try mixing frozen berries in your next sweet dessert recipe,

So, now we've stocked the cupboards, what's next?

It's cooking time!

I know you’re probably taking out your phone and about to open your favourite delivery app because cooking your own food every day sounds like a hard task but listen up! It can actually be easier AND cheaper to go from takeaway meals to homemade meals.

This may sound like a hard task but when we replace the convenience of buying store bought meals in a bid to be savvy and eat healthy, food choices don’t need to be a challenge.

I have come up with four recipes that are part of a renewable table. This means that we can use base ingredients to create four (yes you heard that right, four!) meals over four days. Have a cooking day on a Sunday and you'll save yourself a lot of time through the week.

Recipe A: Chickpea Curry 

Serves 8

Ingredients

Method

  • Heat olive oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add chopped onion and cook for 2-3 minutes until onions slightly sweat.
  • Add the garlic and spices, cooking for a further 2 – 3 minutes.
  • Add vegetable stock and tomato, and then bring to the boil and let simmer for 5 minutes.
  • Add chickpeas and let simmer for a further 5 minutes.
  • Add salt and pepper to taste.
  • Split the mixture into 2 portions, setting aside half to be used for the remainder of recipes in this sequence. Store as per instructions below.
  • Add the cooked brown rice to 4 serving bowls, and top with 1/4 of the chickpea curry in each. Add steamed vegetables and serve.

Once the unused portion of curry has cooled to room temperature, place in a sealed glass container and store in the refrigerator. Curry will last for 4 days in the fridge.

Recipe B: Gourmet Sandwich with Indian-spiced Hummus

Makes 4 sandwiches

Ingredients:

Hummus

Leftover curry from Recipe A above (half of the original curry recipe)

Sandwich

  • 8 slices of gluten free bread or bread of choice
  • 20 slices of eggplant, grilled (setting aside 12 slices for future recipes in the sequence.)
  • 8 cos lettuce leaves
  • 1 large tomato slice.
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Method:

  • Separate the chickpeas from curry liquid. Place chickpeas into a high-speed blender and all other hummus ingredients.
  • Blend until smooth and combined.
    • (Note: save the remainder of the curry liquid as a nourishing drink or as a base for your next curry or stew by storing in a jar and leaving in the refrigerator for up to 4 days, or freezing for up to 2 months).
  • Set aside 2/3 of the prepared hummus for Recipe C and D of this sequence by storing in a tightly sealed bowl and refrigerating for up to 4 days.
  • Prepare sandwiches by laying out 4 slices of bread, spreading hummus evenly across each slice, and then adding 2 slices of eggplant, 2 lettuce leaves and ¼ of the sliced tomato across each slice.  Season with salt and pepper, then cover with partnering slice of bread.

Recipe C: Mezze Plate

Place all of the below recipes onto your mezze plate.

Ingredients:

Hummus

  • ½ of the leftover hummus from Recipe B, with the remaining portion for Recipe D below
  • Drizzle extra virgin olive oil
  • Sprinkle paprika

Parsley, goat’s feta and pine nut dip

(Tip: Make a batch of this on your cooking day to save you time later)

  • 2 bunches of parsley, without stems
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • ½ cup pine nuts
  • 200g goat’s feta (reserve 100 gms for Recipe D)
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Extra pine nuts and parsley leaves to garnish

Wheat-free Tabbouleh

(Tip: Make a batch of this on your continuum cooking day to save you time later!)

  • 70g quinoa, rinsed
  • 80g flat-leaf parsley, chopped
  • 1 handful mint, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • 80ml lemon juice
  • 1 tsp lemon zest
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 small Lebanese cucumber, diced
  • 4 vine-ripened tomatoes, diced
  • 3 spring onions, sliced

Method

Hummus

  • Add leftover hummus to a serving bowl and drizzle with extra virgin olive oil.
  • Sprinkle with paprika.

Eggplant

  • Chop 4 slices eggplant into squares and sprinkle with sea salt.

Parsley, goat’s feta and pine nut dip

  • Combine all ingredients in a blender and mix until combined.
  • Place into a serving bowl and sprinkle with extra pine nuts and parsley leaves to garnish.

Wheat-free Tabbouleh

  • Cook the quinoa in a saucepan of simmering water until tender, about 15 minutes. Set aside to cool.
  • In a bowl, place the parsley, mint, garlic, salt, lemon juice and zest, olive oil, cucumber, tomatoes and spring onion, mixing all ingredients until well combined.
  • Season with freshly ground black pepper.
  • Stir through the quinoa and mix thoroughly.
  • Place 2/3 of the mixture into a bowl to serve. With the remaining 1/3, set aside for Recipe D below, placing into a sealed container and storing in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.

Recipe D: Baked Falafel Burgers with Tabouleh and Spicy Hummus

This the perfect mid-week dinner, or a mouth-watering lunch meal that’s easy to store and take to work. With most the elements already prepared, you’ll effortlessly create this gourmet burger with plenty of time to sit and enjoy.

Makes 4 burgers

Ingredients:

Falafel balls

  • 75g sunflower seeds
  • 80g cashews
  • 1 tbsp organic nut butter, softened
  • 2 tbsp basil leaves, chopped
  • ½ tsp ground cumin
  • 2 tbsp fresh squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 tsp chopped coriander leaves
  • 2 tbsp chopped red capsicum
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • ¼ shallot, chopped
  • Pinch sea salt
  • 40g toasted sesame seeds, for coating

Burger

  • 8 x slices of gluten free bread/quinoa bread/rosemary and flaxseed bread to make 4 burgers
  • Leftover Hummus
  • Leftover tabbouleh
  • Leftover eggplant slices
  • 8 crispy lettuce leaves
  • 100 gms leftover goat’s feta
  • Pinch of sea salt to taste

Method

Falafel balls

  • Preheat oven to 220 degrees Celsius and line a baking tray with baking paper.
  • Place all falafel ingredients, except sesame seeds, in a food processor and pulse until thoroughly blended.
  • Use a spoon to form 4 falafel balls, flattening out the ball to form patty shapes.
  • Coat in the sesame seeds, transfer to the baking tray and bake for 15 minutes until crispy.

Burger

  • To build burger, heat each slice of bread under a grill for a few minutes to slightly heat and colour the top.
  • Lay out 4 slices and spread hummus on each.
  • Stack the 2 slices of eggplant, goat’s feta and falafel patty on top, place crispy lettuce on the plate and spoon in some tabouleh.  Top sandwich with the second piece of bread to form the burger.

I hope this has given you a few ideas to supercharge your kitchen and meals!

Lee xo

Fighting the family worm disaster with Diatomaceous Earth

Written by Lee on . Posted in Blog, gut healing, gut health, Heal Your Gut Powder, Heal Your Gut Powder, healthy gut. digestive health, Healthy Home, Herbal Medicine, Kids, Learn, Spotlight On

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Worms. I’m sorry, this isn’t the most enjoyable subject material, but if you’re a mum or dad with  school aged children, you may already be familiar with this unsavoury situation. If you haven’t experienced it in your family yet, it’s time to get informed so that when the problem rears its ugly head you know exactly how to tackle it. I also have some great news on a natural way you can rid your body of these pesky critters before resorting to drugs.

Pinworms, also known as threadworms are the a parasitic worm and the most common worm infection in Australia, the UK and the USA.  Kids are more likely to pick up an infection than an adult, probably because of children’s tendency to put their fingers in their mouths, and you may notice worms emerging in your family when your littlies begin day care and school. An annoying truth of the childhood worms experience is that once a child is infected, other members of their household are also likely to get pinworms unless strict hygiene practices are observed.

Threadworms are spread by children scratching their bottom and carrying the worm eggs back to their mouth with their hands. They can also be spread indirectly through food and dust. The eggs can survive up to two weeks outside the body, and once these eggs are swallowed, they hatch in the small intestine and travel down.

Despite the ugly reputation, a pinworm infection is relatively harmless and can be easily treated.

What to look out for

Signs of a pinworm in children include

  • Tiredness, or generally feeling “out of sorts”
  • Disturbed sleep
  • Lowered appetite
  • Itchy bottom, especially at night
  • Small white worms appearing around the anus
  • White worms in stools

Home care practices

When you notice an infection of worms, you can help reduce the spread to family members through

  • Discouraging scratching the bottom
  • Keeping everyone’s fingernails trimmed and clean. A nail scrubber is a good option.
  • Washing hands with warm soapy water after the toilet
  • Laundering bedding in hot water
  • Vacuuming the house often to remove eggs

Ridding the body of worms naturally

Diatomaceous Earth is a brilliant first step alternative to over the counter drugs and is something that I personally consume regularly to rid my body of parasites, especially during travel overseas or if I suspect an infection. It’s been very effective in gently cleansing my digestive system. And a clean digestive system is the starting point for overall body and mind health. It’s also a beautiful all-rounder for family gut health and cleansing and because it is a food not a supplement, it's safe for adults and children.

Diatomaceous earth is one of the best natural, food based anti-parasitic medications. It works by attracting bacteria, fungi, viruses, pesticides, drug residues etc to absorb them. The hollow cylinder structure allows pathogenic bacteria to become trapped and passed through the body. Larger parasites found in the stomach are actually cut up and killed by the Diatomaceous Earth particles!

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My naturopathic grade, Diatomaceous Earth, also known as organic fossil shell flour or as I like to call it Dinosaur powder, also contains 15 minerals that are beneficial to your overall health and wellbeing. With its detoxifying properties, you and your children will be able to absorb these minerals much more effectively!  Being high in silica it has the added benefits of better hair, skin and nails too.

One tablespoon of diatomaceous earth taken by an adult, once a day for seven days, can be extremely effective for killing parasites. When used on children, bear in mind that height is a better indicator of the size of their G.I. tracts than their weights. Thus, a child who is 4 feet tall should take 2 teaspoons, and a child who is 2 feet tall should take 1 teaspoon.

You can simply add your appropriate dose to water or juice twice a day, preferably before meals. You can even add it to smoothies or sprinkle it on top of your children’s cereal as it’s completely free of additives, fillers, sugars, artificial sweeteners or preservatives!

Love Your Gut, Diatomaceous Earth is a safe food grade product and of the highest D Earth grade. When using it, be sure to drink plenty of fluids and always consult your health care practitioner when treating children.

Find out more about my Love Your Gut Powder here.

Spotlight on Spinach Plus Spinach Loaf Recipe

Written by Lee on . Posted in All, Autumn, Blog, Blog Breakfast, Blog Dinner, Blog Lunch, Blog Salads, Candida Friendly, Dairy Free, Dehydrating Food, Dessert, Gluten Free, Nutrient Rich, Organic, Sauces, Seasonal, Shopping List, Spotlight On, Spring, Sugar Free, Summer, Supercharged Food Menu, Vegetarian, Wheat Free, Winter, Yeast Free

Screen Shot 2015-06-29 at 9.28.37 am

With the rise in popularity of “superfood” greens such as kale and collard greens, it appears that my favourite spinach has taken a backseat.

But this tasty, affordable and incredibly versatile green deserves a place as a staple item on the household-shopping list, as it remains one of the most nutritionally dense foods around.

It’s no wonder spinach was Popeye’s food of choice, with just a one cup serving providing 35% of your daily iron needs, 84% of your manganese, 65% of your Folate and a whopping 300% of your daily vitamin A requirement!

As part of the amaranth family, there are three different types of spinach generally available – savoy, smooth-leaf, and baby spinach, with the latter being the most popular. Savoy has crisp, creased curly leaves, whilst smooth-leaf (or English) spinach has flat, unwrinkled, spade-shaped leaves that are great in soups and stews. All varieties of spinach have a milder flavour and delicate texture compared to most leafy greens (such as kale), making spinach a much more child-proof vegetable, and an easy addition to any juice or smoothie.

Try to choose organic spinach leaves if you can as this leafy green is exposed to pesticides more readily than, say, a root vegetable that is more protected in the ground as it grows.

If you aren’t able to afford organic, wash your spinach with a little white or apple cider vinegar to reduce any pesticide residue.

Calorie for calorie, leafy green vegetables such as spinach provide more nutrients than any other food. This is why health professionals across the world and most dietary disciplines (vegan, paleo, holistic, mainstream) are united in their belief that they should form the bulk of your diet.

Spinach has a high water content, helping to not only keep you hydrated, but also making you feel fuller and reducing your tendency to load up on denser, nutritionally poorer choices.

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