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Six ways to improve your gut health + Vegetable Marrakesh Casserole

Written by Lee on . Posted in Blog, Blog Dinner, Blog Lunch, Flavour of the month, Golden Gut Blend, gut healing, gut health, Heal Your Gut, Learn, microbiome, Seasonal, Vegetarian

You know that old saying: ‘happy life, happy wife’? If you want my personal opinion, I think it should be changed to ‘happy tummy, happy mummy’.  As many of you know, the gut is the cornerstone to health and linked to many other bodily systems and parts. It can affect your hormones, immune system, your emotions and mental capacity and of course the way that you absorb and digest food. If your gut isn’t happy, there’s a fairly good chance that you won’t be happy either.

Today I’m sharing six of my favourite tips to improve your gut health, so you can get on with life!

Include Fibre

When considering the health of your gut, consider fibre! Getting the right type of fibre into your diet will help you to create a healthy and diverse community of gut bacteria and regulate your digestion. There are two types of fibre. Insoluble fibre this is the one that doesn’t dissolve in water and helps speed up the passage of food and keep you regular, like some grains, nuts, seeds, beans, fruit and vegetables. The other type of fibre, soluble fibre, dissolves in water and helps form a gel in the body. Foods rich in soluble fibre include oatmeal, psyllium husks, berries, lentils, fruit and vegetables. Insoluble fibres are wonderful for flushing out the body but an excess of these fibres can be irritating. Soluble fibres on the other hand, are the ones you can also focus on for improved gut health.

When you eat the soluble fibres from whole plant foods, your gut bacteria ferment these fibres into short chain fatty acids which act as prebiotics to feed the good bacteria in your gut. When you eat adequate levels of soluble fibre, they pass through the stomach and small intestine and land up in the large intestine where they help grow your probiotic bacteria.  This helps maintain the lining of the gut, improves digestion, increases absorption of minerals and can even increase immune system function.  You can read more about probiotics and prebiotics here or learn abut it in my new book Supercharge Your Gut.

Some foods rich in soluble-fibre include sweet potatoes, carrots and root vegetables, green leafy vegetables, berries, nuts and seedsgrass fed, organic butter and ghee. Some of these delicious prebiotic and probiotic-rich foods can be found in my Marrakesh Casserole below!

Glowing skin is an inside (and outside) job

The skin is the largest and arguably, one of the most important organs in your body, it’s the barometer to measure and notice what is really going on inside. Dry skin brushing is an easy and calming technique that looks after your skin, stimulates the digestive and lymphatic systems, liver and adrenal glands, and assists these organs in decongesting. It also helps to give the body a gentle internal massage to stimulate circulation. Whenever I suggest dry skin brushing to someone when they’re suffering from gut health issues, they often look at me as if I’m crazy – how does brushing my skin make my stomach work properly? Well, by performing this technique you’ll actually be assisting the gut, by stimulating the digestive system, nutrient absorption and detoxification!

All you need to do is invest in a long-handled bath brush which contains natural bristles. Use long strokes, in a circular motion towards the heart. Before you dive straight in to brushing, ensure both your skin and your brush are dry. Begin with the soles of your feet and continue brushing upwards on both sides of your legs, then move to your back, then around to your abdomen where you can work in a clockwise direction following the direction of your colon and then head up towards your heart being careful with the chest region. Then, have a shower to remove debris and dead skin cells. Turns out you CAN brush your way to good gut health – who knew? 

Keeping stress levels at bay

Coming into one of the most frantic seasons this time of year, stress can be at a high. Long-term stress lingers for weeks and can be incredibly damaging to the gut. Evidence shows that our gut bacteria respond in a damaging way to negative emotions and stress out our bodies! When you’re stressed, your body produces hormones that can contribute to the proliferation of bad bacteria in the gut, sending it off kilter and this can lead to cravings, skin disruptions, fatigue and weight gain. In order to keep our guts happy and humming, keeping stress at bay is key. Obviously, decreasing stress can look a little bit different to everybody, so find out what works best for you. A few good stress-busting techniques include calming yoga, walks, ocean swims, meditation, spending time out in the sun, good talks with friends and connecting with nature. I guess it’s time to get your ‘om’ on!

Goodbye sugar-free sweeteners

Of course, there’s more to gut health than the practices we do – it’s also important to look at what you’re feeding your gut. Unfortunately for some of you, this may mean saying sayonara to sugar-free sweeteners. Sugar-free sweets, snacks and diet soft drinks can aggravate the gut and cause bloating because of all the artificial chemicals they contain. These chemicals, that our DNA doesn’t recognise or can’t digest properly, get completely swept up in the digestive tract and end-up in the colon, which is not what you want to happen when healing the gut! Large amounts of these additives can also cause flatulence; definitely another reason to stay away. There are far better ways to blow someone away.

Hydration

I know what you’re thinking, if I hear another nutritionist talk about hydration being the key to good health, I’ll roll my eyes so far backwards they won’t come back to place! But, the simple technique of staying hydrated helps flush out negative bacteria within the gut and balance out the digestive system. This helps your body undergo all the complicated biochemical mechanisms to keep your gut happy and functioning. So yes, drinking water may be simple, but it does remarkable things for your gut health.  I usually stir a tablespoon of my Love Your Gut powder in the mornings into a cup of warm water.  It helps to clean the debris and keep my insides happy.  If you want to stay hydrated throughout the day, my Golden Gut Blend is a great way to mix it up- just add a tablespoon to warm milk of choice; it makes a gorgeous and tasty golden latte!

Stop gulping!

Eating is not a race. And yet, we all tend to scoff down our food so quickly you’d think we were going for gold at the Olympics! Our modern lack of mindful, slow eating and our forever on-the-go approach has a definite link to our gut heath issues. Gulping down food, guzzling down drinks and moving while eating inhibits your body’s ability to digest nutrients properly. Chewing more thoroughly while sitting down to a meal mindfully helps you tune into your body more and send your body into rest and digest mode. You’ll be less likely to overeat when you know you’re full! Plus, when you chew properly, your food is able to mix with saliva and increase the ease of digestibility before it reaches the stomach. This means it’s less hard work for your gut and less chance of that food-baby feeling. 

Getting hungry? Enjoy this prebiotic-rich Marrakesh Casserole, from my book Eat Clean, Green and Vegetarian, slowly and mindfully. If done correctly, it'll nourish your gut, your body and your soul! 

Marrakesh Casserole

Ingredients:

  • 60 ml (2 fl oz/1/4 cup) cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 large onion, roughly chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 cm (3/4 inch) piece of ginger, minced
  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 tablespoon turmeric
  • 1/4 teaspoon Celtic sea salt
  • 2–3 teaspoons dried harissa
  • 400 g (14 oz) tin diced tomatoes
  • 1 tablespoon rice malt syrup
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 1/4 cup coriander (cilantro) leaves
  • 1/4 cup chopped mint leaves
  • 1 small pumpkin (winter squash), peeled and cut into 5 cm (2 inch) pieces
  • 1 sweet potato, peeled and cut into 5 cm (2 inch) pieces 
  • 3 carrots, peeled and cut into 5 cm (2 inch) pieces
  • 1 zucchini (courgette), cut into 5 cm (2 inch) pieces
  • 400 g (14 oz) tin chickpeas
  • cooked quinoa, to serve
  • coriander (cilantro) sprigs, to serve
  • 1 tablespoon grated lemon zest, to serve
  • mint leaves, to serve
  • 80 g (23/4 oz/1/2 cup) almonds, to serve

Directions:

  • Heat the olive oil in a flame-proof tagine pot or casserole dish over medium heat and sauté the onion for 5 minutes, or until translucent.
  • Add the garlic, ginger and spices and stir well to combine.
  • Add the harissa, tomatoes, rice malt syrup, lemon juice, coriander and mint, bring to the boil and then reduce the heat.
  • Add the pumpkin, sweet potato, carrot and zucchini, stir well so they are all well covered in the sauce and simmer, covered, for 1 hour.
  • Add the chickpeas and cook for a further 5 minutes.
  • Serve on a bed of quinoa topped with the coriander, lemon zest, mint and roasted almonds.

Repurpose a halloween pumpkin + five delicious recipes

Written by Lee on . Posted in Blog, Flavour of the month, Golden Gut Blend, Halloween, Seasonal, Summer, Thanksgiving, Vegetarian

Halloween is here, and with it comes jack 'o' lantern making and trick or treating. Once the hullabaloo of halloween is over, the question is, what to do with the leftover pumpkins?

I'm taking the horror out of your carved to perfection creations with some not so scary repurposed pumpkin recipes.

At midnight your cinderella coach can be transformed into the crunchiest crisps, spiced up porridge, raspberry studded pie, golden loaf or a hearty salad for the whole family.  

And if you're keen for more recipes and ways to understand your pumpkins better, read my spotlight on pumpkin here.

Here are five delicious tricks for pumpkin treats!  Let me know how you chose to repurpose yours?

 

 

Pumpkin Porridge Recipe here.

Pumpkin Pie recipe here.

Golden Gut Pumpkin and Nut Loaf recipe here.

Lamb and Spiced Pumpkin Salad

Serves 2

Warm salads are colourful, packed with nutrients and wonderful for digestion. The slow-roasted baby tomatoes and spiced pumpkin can be prepared in advance and warmed prior to serving to allow for quick assembly. For a dairy-free option, omit the goat’s cheese.

  • 150 g (5½ oz/1 cup) cherry tomatoes
  • 1 butternut pumpkin (squash), skin on and cut into small wedges
  • ½ teaspoon ground cumin
  • ½ teaspoon ground coriander
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil, melted, plus extra for pan-frying
  • Celtic sea salt and freshly ground
  • black pepper
  • 3 large handfuls of mixed baby mesclun
  • 250 g (9 oz) lamb backstrap
  • 1 handful of basil leaves
  • 60 g (2¼ oz/½ cup) goat’s cheese

DRESSING

  • 2 tablespoons tahini
  • juice of ½ lemon
  • good pinch of Celtic sea salt and freshly
  • ground black pepper

Preheat the oven to 150°C (300°F/Gas 2).
To make the dressing, combine all the ingredients in a jug. Whisk thoroughly, gradually adding a little warm water until the dressing is smooth, thick and creamy.

Place the tomatoes on a baking tray and cook for 2–3 hours, turning every hour or so, until they are shrivelled and bursting with sweetness. This step is best done ahead of time to allow for a very quick assembly. Reheat the tomatoes slightly before serving.

Increase the oven temperature to 200°C (400°F/Gas 6). Place the pumpkin, cumin, coriander, cinnamon and ginger in a bowl and use your hands to mix well. Place the pumpkin on a baking tray, drizzle with the melted coconut oil, and season with salt and pepper. Cook in the oven for 30 minutes, or until golden and crispy.

Season the lamb. Add the coconut oil to a frying pan over medium heat and pan-fry the lamb for 3 minutes on each side (it should still be pink in the centre). Let it rest for
a few minutes before slicing into 5 mm (¼ inch) pieces.

To assemble the salad, make a bed of salad leaves and top with the warm pumpkin, lamb and tomatoes. Drizzle the tahini dressing generously over the top, scatter with the basil leaves and goat’s cheese and serve warm.

A Supercharged Tip
Lamb backstrap is a tender, grade-A cut of lamb that can be prepared simply and easily. Try pan-frying, searing, grilling (broiling), or oven roasting.

Oven-roasted pumpkin crisps

The best way to achieve evenly thin pumpkin slices is by using a mandoline, or the slicing blade on your food processor.

1/2 small pumpkin (winter squash) extra virgin olive oil, for brushing

Preheat the oven to 150oC (300oF/Gas 2). Cut the pumpkin into two or three chunks, then peel, if desired, and seed each chunk. Using a mandoline or the slicing blade on your food processor, cut the chunks into very thin slices, about 2 mm (1/16 inch) thick. Dry the slices on paper towels. The tail ends and odd sizes can be used for other recipes, such as mashed pumpkin.

Place the pumpkin slices in a single layer on two
lined baking trays. Brush with olive oil and sprinkle with a good pinch of sea salt. The salt helps draw moisture from the vegetables, so let them sit for 5 minutes before placing in the oven.

Bake the pumpkin slices for 25 minutes, or until crisp and golden.

Remove from the oven to cool completely — the slices will crisp up as they cool. The crisps will stay fresh in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.

Makes lots!

*Supercharged tip If you’re ever buying commercially prepared vegie crisps, check the packet for added flours such as corn and potato, along with artificial colourings and flavourings.

Happy Halloween!

Oven Baked Veg and Garlic Soup with Toasted Seeds

Written by Lee on . Posted in anti-inflammatory, Blog, Blog Dinner, Blog Lunch, Candida Friendly, Dairy Free, Flavour of the month, Gluten Free, gut healing, gut health, Heal Your Gut, Nutrient Rich, Organic, Seasonal, Soups & Salads, Sugar Free, Vegetarian, Wheat Free, Winter, Yeast Free

I'm going back to the future.

I love blogging and sharing my food adventures with you.

And you sharing right back.

It's what Supercharged Food is all about and why I started blogging in the first place.

So, I’ve decided I’m going back to basics.

You know, when the blogger make a recipe at home in their kitchen, away from the hullabaloo that is life?

Forget FaceTime! Let's get back to face to face time.

Say hello to good old-fashioned, simple Supercharged food blogs.

Here’s the first…

Curate your date night with my Oven Baked Veg and Garlic Soup with Toasted Seeds.

Whether you’re facing first-date butterflies and you want to seriously impress your first date or, you want to make your long-time partner feel a little more special, this SOUPercharged recipe is sure to do the trick. 

Get changed out of your tracksuit pants and throw on your fanciest get-up because date night at home need not be casual!

You don’t need a specific day to show someone you love them. Sometimes love can come through in the simplest of gestures - like making a warming pot of soup with some candles and soft tunes to gently sway to on the couch. 

This baked veg soup is husband-approved and absolutely fool-proof. You can even throw it together while you're getting home from a long day. It's sure to warm you both up from the inside out. 

So, what makes this soup so soupercharged? The cruciferous vegetable, cauliflower, can help fight inflammation because it's rich in antioxidants and anti-inflammatories. Whilst garlic can help lower cholesterol and combat heart disease!  Who knew healthy eating could be so sexy?

Don't forget the seedy topping! Seeds are rich in  zinc - a crucial but often forgotten mineral that helps with growth, immunity and can even improve our skin.

And of course, the best part of having a date night at home is what happens after dinner...... 😉

Get your head out of the gutter - I'm a food blogger after all! 

I'm talking about DESSERT. 

Be sure to try out my love heart chocolates. These indulgent delights, with their special smooth and velvety texture and chocolaty buttery taste, are melt-in-your mouth good.  

You'll wonder why you ever made reservations in the first place...

Oven Baked Veg and Garlic Soup with Toasted Seeds

Serves 2-3

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cauliflower cut into florets
  • 2 zucchinis chopped into cubes
  • 1 carrot chopped into cubes
  • 1/2 bulb garlic unpeeled (about 6 cloves)
  • 2 tbs olive oil
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • Pinch chili flakes
  • 1 knob butter or 1 tbs olive oil
  • 500gms veg or beef stock
  • 2 tbs tomato paste
  • 2 tbs lemon juice
  • 2 tbs wheat free tamari
  • 1 tsp ginger grated

Top with:

  • 1/4 cup toasted seeds
  • Fresh coriander

Method:

Heat oven to 240 degrees Celsius

Place veg and garlic on a baking tray and splosh with olive oil then add spices and stir to coat

Bake for 25 to 30 mins

Once ready heat butter/oil in heavy based saucepan

Squeeze garlic into pan and break up with a wooden spoon

Place veg into pan and stir

Add stock and remaining ingredients and stir then bring to the boil and reduce heat place on lid and simmer for 10 mins

Ladle into bowls and top with toasted seeds and fresh coriander

Supercharged Dahl (It’s Totally Dahl-icious!)

Written by Lee on . Posted in anti-inflammatory, Autumn, Ayurveda, Blog, Blog Dinner, Blog Lunch, Dairy Free, Eat Right for Your Shape, Flavour of the month, Gluten Free, gut healing, gut health, Nutrient Rich, Organic, Seasonal, Summer, Vegetarian, Wheat Free, Winter, Yeast Free

I think we all know those people who love and embrace everything about India, the sights, the culture, the colours and especially the FOOD!

Some of them take trips every year, stay at a minimalist yoga retreat and come back totally ‘spiritual’, #cultured and a changed person. 

If you're one of those people or anything like me, half Indian and half English and living between two cultures, or if you're just looking for a gentle reminder to get your 'Eat Pray Love' on, then you’ve come to the right place! 

If an Ashram sounds a little too hard-core right now, I’ve got the perfect dish that’ll make you feel as if you’re ‘connecting to your core’ and being healed internally by the local medicine man.

Transform your kitchen into an Indian land of spices with all of the aromatic colours and flavours of this beautiful country. I’m helping you put the authentic back into Indian food with a DAHLiciously easy dinner that is equally warm, comforting, wholesome and supercharged!.

Indian food has a way of catering to everyone’s food preferences – whether you’re gluten-free, vegan, sugar-free or anything else-free, this dahl can be catered to suit your needs. It’s Indian cooking made easy and people-friendly.

So, what is Dahl (or daal or dal)? It’s an Indian dish of curried, spiced lentils. It’s one of my favourite meals to make when I’m in a CURRY because it’s quick and simple. I’ve included anti-inflammatory turmeric, high-fibre lentils, antioxidant-rich garlic, nausea-relieving ginger and digestive-improving cumin to make this dahl rich in nutrients and perfectly grounding. This superb combination is warming and immune-boosting to help fight off colds all year long.

Growing up with my Indian background, lentil dahl has always made me feel at home.  If you want to know more about my ever-evolving love of India and Ayurveda, you can read about my Indian adventures or check out my Ayurvedic-inspired book, Eat Right for Your Shape

Let’s talk about the star of this Bollywood show - Lentils!

Lentils aren't just a good option for plant-based enthusiasts. These legumes punch way above their weight when it comes to protein, iron and nutrients.

Lentils are a low-calorie, nutrient-packed legume with a nutty and earthy flavour. They contain a great source of prebiotics which means they benefit our existing gut bacteria and feed our communities of healthy flora to keep  everything running smoothly :oops:.  Lentils also contain dietary fibre, protein, iron, B1, zinc, potassium and more!

Because they're high in insoluble fibre, they can help prevent constipation and even relieve irritable bowel syndrome.  They're a plant-based source of both protein and iron that can help lower cholesterol, stabilise blood sugar and look after heart health. These little legumes can also help with weight loss because they’re high in nutrients like fibre, protein, minerals and vitamins and low in calories which means they keep us full and satisfied - Bonus!

Just remember, lentils aren't everyone's best friend. They can increase flatulence so if you're trying them out for the first time, I suggest eating them with close friends or family or soaking them beforehand. 

Supercharged Dhal

Just like fine wine and cheese, there’s something about dahl that only gets better with age. This dahl makes for the perfect lunch the next day. That's, if you haven’t finished it before then!

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups red lentils rinsed
  • 4 cups vegetable stock or water
  • 2 tsps turmeric
  • 2 knobs unsalted butter
  • 2 tsps cumin seeds
  • 3 cardamom pods lightly crushed
  • 4 cloves
  • 4 cloves garlic, finely sliced
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 1 fresh green chilli deseeded and finely sliced
  • 1 inch piece ginger grated
  • 1 1/2 cup chopped tomatoes
  • 1 inch cinnamon stick or 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • pinch sea salt

Method: 

Place the lentils in a pan add stock or water to cover and bring to the boil (skimming off any scum that rises to the top).  Once boiled turn heat down to a gentle simmer and add turmeric and 1 knob butter. Cover with a lid, and let simmer (about 15 mins) stirring occasionally and adding more liquid if required.

In a small frying pan, over a medium heat place a small amount of butter and add cumin seeds, cardamom pods, cloves and fry for about a minute until fragrant (the seeds may pop).

Remove the tempered spices from the pan and set aside in a small bowl.

Melt remaining butter in the same frying pan over a medium heat and fry garlic, onion, chillies, grated ginger and tomatoes, add the cinnamon, coriander and tempered spices and cook until onion is translucent.

Remove from the heat and set aside until lentils are cooked through, then stir through spice mix.

Season to taste, ladle into bowls and serve with fresh coriander.

Salted Caramel Slice

Written by Lee on . Posted in anti-inflammatory, Blog, Dairy Free, Dessert, Desserts, Flavour of the month, Gluten Free, Organic, Spring, Sugar Free, Summer, supercharged food, Vegetarian, Winter

salted caramel slice

Today I'm supercharging a classic cake stall favourite straight outta the 80's.  Back in the day when fashions and seasons were mixed; leg warmers and mini skirts, lace with acid wash jeans, now I'm combining salt and caramel!  

Say hello to my gooey and melt-in-the-mouth Salted Caramel Slice, a dessert sure to be a sell out at every school fete across the country.

These beauties are gluten-free, dairy-free, refined-sugar free and full of healthy mood boosting ingredients.  I mean, what kind of person doesn’t break into a smile when they’re gobbling down a piece of chocolatey caramel slice? You’ll be surprised at how something so delicious can actually be so nutritious!

To reach their supercharged potential, I've rounded up some cashews and almonds to make the base. Cashews are great for zinc, iron and vitamins E, K and B6 and almonds are known for their fibre levels, protein, iron, magnesium and vitamin E.

These slices are full of lip-licking and tongue-tingling goodness, and satisfy your sweet cravings without adding inches to your waistline! They partner well with a pot of tea and best served chilled.

If you're looking for a healthy dessert to wow your guests or a superfood snack for afternoon tea, you've come to the right place! 

So, what are you waiting for?

Here’s what you need:

Ingredients: 

Base

  • 1 cup raw cashews
  • 1 cup raw almonds
  • 1/2 cup buckwheat groats
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil, melted
  • 1 tbsp rice malt syrup
  • a few cracks of sea salt

Filling: 

  • 1 cup cashew butter
  • 1/3 cup rice malt syrup
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil 
  • a few cracks of sea salt 

Chocolate topping:

  • 1 tbsp coconut oil 
  • 1 tbsp cacao butter
  • 2 tsp cacao powder

Method: 

  1. For the base, combine cashews, almonds and buckwheat in a food processor
  2. Transfer to a bowl and add coconut oil, rice malt syrup and sea salt. This is best combined using hands and then pressing into a brownie tin. Leave in fridge for an hour or freezer for half an hour while preparing the filling. 
  3. To make filling, combine all ingredients in a bowl and spread on top of the base. Leave in the fridge for an hour or freezer for half an hour. 
  4. To make the topping melt coconut oil and cacao butter, add cacao powder and stir until there is no lumps... Drizzle on top of slice and set in the fridge or freezer. Top with shredded coconut and a few more cracks of sea salt!

Give them a whirl and let me know what you think in the comments section below 🙂

Spotlight on Peas and Pea Soup Recipe

Written by Lee on . Posted in Autumn, Blog, Blog Breakfast, Blog Dinner, Blog Lunch, Blog Salads, Dairy Free, Flavour of the month, Gluten Free, Nutrient Rich, Spring, Sugar Free, Summer, Vegetarian, Wheat Free, Winter

veg 7 - Copy Flavour of the month
I’ve been zig-zagging the country for the past couple of months giving talks about my latest book Eat Clean Green and Vegetarian and one of the common requests that I’ve encountered is the opportunity to look at individual ingredients in more detail.
I’m going to be adding a new section to the blog whereby each month I’ll shine the spotlight on one of my favourite ingredients and present its unique health benefits, along with deliciously clean and simple recipes.
To kick off, I’m letting you in on one of my favourite secret ingredients the overly overlooked green pea.  By the end of this post I hope that you’ll agree this little pocket rocket will be worth shelling out for.
The dreaded green pea has for some families and in particular their children been one of the worst nightmares at the dinner table, primarily in the form of a torturous sphere of green mush on a plate.
However, with the help of my new column I’m hoping to reignite the vividly emerald Green Pea and provide it with a new lease of life in your kitchen by offering you an insight into its enormous health reimbursements.
Background
Although we consider the pea a vegetable for culinary purposes, each pea pod and its contents is collectively a fruit, and the peas inside are the seeds.
The toddlers of the bunch are harvested young and known as snow peas and sugar snap peas, or mangetout. The latter being fuller and rounder than pea pods and both the pod and peas can be eaten.  To prepare younger varieties, rinse in cold water, and top and tail by removing the string running along either side of the pod.
Sugar snaps are delicious in a stir fry or crunchy salad or steamed until crisp then topped with olive oil. Snow peas have an edible pod that is flatter and it’s best to look for smaller more tender versions.

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