Instagram200    

My Favourite Mince and Pea Dish

Written by lee on . Posted in Autumn, Ayurveda, Blog, Blog Dinner, Blog Lunch, Dairy Free, Dinner, Eat Right for Your Shape, Healthy Meals, Lunch, Nutrient Rich, Organic, Recipe Book, Spring, Sugar Free, Summer, supercharged food, Supercharged Food Menu, Wheat Free, Winter, Yeast Free

screen-shot-2016-09-24-at-8-27-34-am

When investing into quality food; organic and free of chemicals, it can unfortunately be quite a hit on the family food budget without some wallet friendly recipes up your sleeve.

If frugality is just as important to you as nourishment, then I have the perfect recipe for you. This tasty Mince and Pea dish, also known as Keema Matar is one of my favourite budget friendly Ayurvedic recipes from my book Eat Right For Your Shape, and is ultra wholesome and balancing for finance fearing Vatas who require affordable and grounding comfort food at the end of their day.

Keema is a traditional Indian meat dish, and it’s believed that the word may have been borrowed from Greece and originally meant ‘minced meat’. Traditionally, this dish uses minced mutton (lamb or goat) with peas or potatoes. Keema can be made from almost any meat, can be cooked by stewing or frying, and can be formed into kababs. Keema is also sometimes used as a filling for samosas or naan.

If you’re a Vata, it’s no wonder you have money worries. Vata’s are governed by the flighty element of air- naturally cold, light, dry, dynamic and ever changing. Complexities and changes in financial situations will stress you out, so when it comes to your food budget, you need a stable set of money saving recipes that you can rely on week in and week out. Your thoughts and your physical body are completely interlocked, so if money is a stress for you, it will manifest also in physical ailments like poor circulation, brittle nails, frizzy hair, dark eye circles, insomnia and muscular aches and pains.

As a Vata, you’ll definitely want to choose foods that are warming, oily, heavy, sweet and salty to help ground your anxious thoughts and bring a sense of stability to your body and mind. This scrumptious Keema Matar will tick all of these boxes:

WARMING- through the use of fiery grounding spices like chilli powder and ginger, which will rev up your sluggish digestion; a link to anxiousness.

OILY- through the use of gorgeous ghee. This nourishing golden oil is slightly sweet and lubricating for your dry and cold constitution.

HEAVY- through the keema (mince); lamb or beef will provide a heavy and earthing quality, igniting a sense of groundedness and pacifying the effects of worry and stress in your life.

SWEET- through the use of gorgeous green peas. These really are the lollies of the vegetable kingdom; reducing Vata which is typically sharp and cold.

All the ingredients in this dish are also super affordable. A pack of frozen peas, even in organic form will cost around two or three dollars, and mince is one of the most affordable animal proteins you can purchase.

This is a recipe I love to batch cook and freeze in single portions for those days when you’re really not in the mood for cooking but need a quick lunch to take to work, or a speedy dinner instead of spending on takeaway.

It's a true saviour!

KEEMA MATAR (MINCE WITH PEAS)

SERVES 4

  • 2 tablespoons ghee
  • 1 large onion, finely sliced
  • 4 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 11⁄2 teaspoons finely grated ginger
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated fresh turmeric or ground turmeric
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon chilli powder
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon Himalayan salt
  • 500 g (1 lb 2 oz) minced (ground) lamb or beef
  • 200 g (7 oz/3⁄4 cup) sheep’s milk yoghurt
  • 215 g (71⁄2 oz/11⁄2 cups) frozen baby peas
  • 2 teaspoons garam masala (optional)
  • freshly cracked black pepper, to taste
  • filtered water (optional), for moistening

To serve

  • Rice of choice  large handful coriander (cilantro) leaves, almonds, roughly chopped, to serve

Heat the ghee in a wok or heavy-based frying pan over medium heat. Add the onion and cook for 3–4 minutes or until soft. Add the garlic and ginger, and cook for 2 minutes, taking care not to burn the garlic. Add the turmeric, chilli, cumin and salt, and stir for a few seconds.

Add the meat and cook, stirring frequently, until it breaks up and colours. Stir through the yoghurt and peas, then reduce the heat to low and cook, covered, for 15 minutes. Stir through the garam masala (if using) and pepper to taste. If you prefer a moist dish, add some filtered water.

Serve with pilau, sprinkled with coriander and almonds.

Happy Cooking 🙂

Lee xo

Share the love

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Digg
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Print

Foods That Boost Happiness :)

Written by lee on . Posted in All, Autumn, Blog, Blog Breakfast, Blog Dinner, Blog Lunch, Blog Salads, Blog Snacks, Breakfast, Candida Friendly, Dairy Free, Dessert, Desserts, Dinner, Gluten Free, Lunch, Nutrient Rich, Organic, Salads, Seasonal, Snacks, Soup, Spring, Sugar Free, Summer, Vegetables, Vegetarian, Wheat Free, Winter, Yeast Free

StirFryBEef

Want to improve your mood?  Did you know that food may be a significant piece of the puzzle?  

The science behind food's effect on mood comes down to chemical and physiological changes in our brain structure which can lead to altered behaviour. Today I'm sharing my favourite mood foods that have been proven to alter your metabolism and brain chemistry, ultimately affecting your energy level and mood.

There is so much hope for your mood in food! The science is showing that you can literally eat your way to happiness, so here are some of my top picks for foods that can boost your emotional health...

Fish oils

sardines avo

A 2012 study reveals that fish oil increases transmission of serotonin in the brain which controls emotion. Because of their ability to increase serotonin levels, fish oils are a lovely mood food to include in your diet. Sardines are my all time favourite source of omega-3 fatty acids and are an affordable and potent source of mood boosting fish oils. Try them in my smashed sardines with avocado on quinoa and flaxseed loaf for your next breakky option.

Brazil nuts

bliss balls

Did you know that brazil nuts are the richest source of the mineral selenium, which helps combat depression? Studies have shown that a small handful of brazil nuts everyday can help improve your emotional health. I like to enjoy them as an on-the-go snack, or chopped and sprinkled over yogurt with grated dark chocolate. Enjoy a hit of happiness by throwing some extra brazil nuts in these delightful Coconut and almond bliss balls.

Broccoli

Broccoli-Soup

Broccoli is a staple veg in my diet. It’s rich in B vitamin folate, which is essential for a healthy mood. Low intakes of the B vitamin folate has been linked to depression, and the great news is that Vitamin B also promotes healthy hair and skin, which boosts your self confidence as your complexion glows. I like to steam broccoli and enjoy with white fish, or in a risotto. I also adore cramming in this mood boosting green in my earthy Broccoli soup.

Ginger

StirFryBEef

Ginger is a gorgeous warming root that has been shown to increase neurotransmitters in the brain. Neurotransmitters are chemicals used by brain cells to communicate with each other. They control your ability to focus, concentrate, remember, and regulate mood, cravings, addictions and sleep.

Ginger increases levels of these important brain chemicals, including dopamine, which is considered the “motivation molecule” that helps you get focused and be productive. It’s also in charge of your pleasure-reward system. Fresh ginger root (especially when sliced into a mug with hot water) also assists in stabilising anxiety and panic. One of my favourite ways to enjoy ginger is in my Stir fried ginger beef; a super speedy and delicious dinner mid week.

Blueberries

Kakadu plum and blueberry icecream

Blueberries can help prevent the release of cortisol, a hormone produced by the adrenal gland during stressful situations, that travels to the hippocampus (a major portion of your brain) and provides emotional responses. Berries can help control and counter the effects of this hormone’s impact on your mood.

Berries are loaded with anthocyanidins, known to boost brain function and antioxidants, which promote brain and nervous system health. Berries are also low in sugar and calories, so pile them on! Enjoy a boost of blueberries in this super antioxidant filled Blueberry and Kakadu plum ice cream which will impress your guests with its unique blend of superfood flavours.

Here's to eating your way to a happy mood!

Share the love

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Digg
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Print

Green Bean Subji

Written by lee on . Posted in anti-inflammatory, Ayurveda, Blog, Blog Dinner, Blog Lunch, Blog Salads, Candida Friendly, Dairy Free, Dinner, Eat Right for Your Shape, Gluten Free, Nutrient Rich, Organic, Salads, Snacks, Spring, Sugar Free, Summer, supercharged food, Supercharged Food Menu, Vegetables, Vegetarian, Wheat Free, Winter

green bean subji

Whoever said that veggies are boring and time consuming deserves a rap across the pork knuckles!

I’m in total awe of the power of veg and constantly surprised by the depths to which I can go in exploring different ways to express the beauty of these gorgeous ground dwellers.

In India, and particularly the Ayurvedic realm; veggies are prized and highly emphasised, not to mention a handy frugal option with high levels of nourishment.

Today I'm sharing a special dish I discovered when I was studying in Kerala. You can read more about my Indian cooking adventures here or in my recipe book Eat Right for Your Shape.

I’m especially proud of Ayurvedic cuisine for its wholesome and innovative approach to preparing quite elaborate meals out of simplistic veg. This glorious green bean subji is a prime example.

Subji is an Indian term that literally means ‘vegetable dish’- and can be in connection with any vegetable in a variety of different cooking methods. Subji’s can be dry, wet, or in curry form.

This spectacular subji is based on the humble green bean, but is impressively dressed up with a list of medicinal and flavourful Ayurvedic ingredients like cumin, ginger, mustard seeds, shredded coconut for texture and the freshness of coriander leaves. In minutes your regular bean is transformed into an exotic, aromatic vegetarian dish that’ll really blow your hair back and widen your eyes.

Share the love

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Digg
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Print

Healthy Rhubarb Crumble

Written by lee on . Posted in Autumn, Blog, Blog Dinner, Blog Lunch, Candida Friendly, Dairy Free, Dessert, Desserts, Desserts, Dinner, Gluten Free, Organic, Recipe Book, Seasonal, Spring, Sugar Free, Summer, supercharged food, Supercharged Food Menu, Vegetarian, Wheat Free, Winter, Yeast Free

rhubarb pies

Crumbles would have to be one of the most simple and comforting desserts on my list for entertaining friends. I love that they can be so versatile; utilising virtually whatever seasonal fruit you have on hand and they’re also very difficult to mess up!  This recipe is from my eBook The Renewable Table.

A crumble, traditionally known as a brown betty, is a dish of British origin that can be made in a sweet or savoury version, depending on ingredients used. A sweet variety is much more common and usually contains some form of stewed fruit topped with a crumbly mixture of fat (usually butter), flour, and sugar.

The most common of the crumbles is the illustrious apple crumble, but they extend to the common use of berries, peaches, plums and delicious rhubarb.

Crumbles boomed in popularity in Britain during World War Two when the nation was in rationing mode and a crumble topping offered a more economical alternative to pies due to shortages of pastry ingredients.

I somehow find a soul connection to the generations of housewives throughout this time in history, who had to learn to be resourceful and frugal, yet still had the desire to put delicious and nourishing meals on the table for friends and family.

A crumble is an extremely versatile and budget friendly option, as toppings can be made from an array of pantry wholegrains and fats like butter, ghee or coconut oil, and glutinous grains can easily be switched up to include a mixture of nuts, seeds, gluten free grain flours and coconut. I sometimes add gluten free oats as a crunchy topping too. Sweeteners are also up for negotiation; utilising wholefood and low fructose sweeteners of your choice.

This crumble uses gorgeous rhubarb, which is packed with vitamins, minerals and other nutrients that are wonderful for supporting a thriving and energetic life. In traditional Chinese medicine, rhubarb is hailed for soothing stomach ailments and relieving constipation, and is also used as a poultice to reduce fevers and swelling.

Rhubarb is also high in vitamin K which makes it a lovely ingredient for improving bone health, and limiting neuronal damage to the brain in the case of Alzheimer’s.

Rhubarb is also an immune system supporting ingredient due to its high levels of vitamin C along with vitamin A for infection fighting and antioxidant protection that will extend to glowing skin, healthy mucous membranes and improved vision.

Enjoy this scrumptious crumble as a delightful and cosy dessert that will bring that joyous element of sweetness into your life without overloading your system with inflammatory wheat and sugar.

Share the love

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Digg
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Print

Gut Healing Salmon Chowder

Written by lee on . Posted in Autumn, Blog, Blog Dinner, Blog Lunch, Candida Friendly, Dairy Free, Digestion, Dinner, Gluten Free, gut healing, gut health, Heal Your Gut, healthy gut. digestive health, Lunch, micro flora, Nutrient Rich, Organic, Seasonal, Soup, Spring, Sugar Free, Summer, Wheat Free, Winter, Yeast Free

salmon chowder

 photo by a happy HYG'er

The votes are in, the #HYGers have had their say and Salmon Chowder has come out on top for the most popular gut healing recipe from my four week Heal Your Gut program!

It’s also a great way to up the anti-(inflammatories) on your Omega 3 quota too.

If time is of the essence you can make it ahead and enjoy the next day, giving a chance for the flavours to meld together even further.  It’s a hearty, comforting and satisfying bowl of deliciousness featuring beautiful pieces of salmon floating across a sea of creamy broth. It’s an ideal meal for the whole family too so you don’t have to just cook for one.

Why is gut health so important?

The gut is the gateway to your body and not only significantly influences your physical health, but it has a major impact on your mental health.  The stomach or gut is one of the key connections to your brain and emotional health and the health of your immune system.

The world within your gut is multifaceted and involves an interdependent relationship between living organisms called micro flora.  Micro flora is the complex, diverse microorganism species that live in your digestive tract. These organisms are also referred to as gut flora and are most easily understood as fitting into the categories of either "good bacteria" or "bad bacteria."

Share the love

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Digg
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Print

Creamy Curried Cauliflower with Cashews

Written by lee on . Posted in Autumn, Blog, Blog Dinner, Blog Lunch, Candida Friendly, Dairy Free, Dinner, Gluten Free, Lunch, Nutrient Rich, Seasonal, Sugar Free, Vegetarian, Wheat Free, Winter, Yeast Free

Like humans, different foods can become better versions of themselves by association. Certain ingredients are taken up to another level when married to Mr. Right; think tomato and basil.  They’ve been soul mates all along, partners in crime, just waiting to bring the best out in one another. Cauliflower is another one that’s transformed when matched up with an eligible bachelor. She’s quite a plain-jane ingredient on her own, but a dead set knock-out when in the right relationship. Although if she were on facebook her relationship status would be “Its complicated". Rather than a sensible matrimony between two ingredients, she benefits greatly from more of an open-marriage, or a multiple-partnered approach.

Share the love

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Digg
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Print

Sautéed Greens

Written by lee on . Posted in Dinner, Recipe Book

  • 2 bunches English Spinach
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 1/c cup vegetable stock or water
  • Celtic sea salt and pepper
  • 1/c cup lemon juiced
  • 2 TBS Olive Oil

Roughly chop spinach

Melt olive oil in a wide, heavy bottomed pan 

Into the pan add chopped garlic and cook for 2 minutes

Place spinach in the pan along with the stock and seasonings and cook for a further 2 minutes

Place the lid on the pan and simmer for about 10 minutes

Remove from heat onto a serving dish and drizzle with lemon

Share the love

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Digg
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Print

Simple Oven Roasted Vegetables

Written by lee on . Posted in Dinner, Recipe Book

Mixed seasonal vegetables of your choice (enough for 4 people)

Dressing

  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice

Preheat the oven to 250ºC (500ºF/Gas 9). 

Peel and chop your vegetables into chunks or wedges and place in a large bowl. 

Put all the dressing ingredients in a jar. 

Screw the lid on tightly, shake well, then pour over the vegetables. 

Toss the vegetables well, making sure they are evenly coated in the dressing. 

Spread the vegetables in a large roasting tin and season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. 

Roast for 35–40 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender, browned and crispy, turning and basting them halfway through. 

Transfer to a warmed platter to serve

Share the love

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Digg
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Print

Garlic and Herb Crusted Rack of Lamb

Written by lee on . Posted in Dinner, Recipe Book

  • 1 rack lamb 
  • 3 garlic cloves chopped
  • 1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper and sea salt
  • 1 TBS finely chopped thyme 
  • 3 TBS finely chopped parsley
  • 4 sprigs rosemary cut into 2mm pieces
  • 2 tsp. extra virgin olive oil 

In a small pan, over medium heat, toast garlic, herbs, sea salt and pepper, stirring, for 45 seconds or until aromatic. 

Transfer to a small bowl and set aside

Preheat oven to 240 degrees Celsius

Place rack of lamb in baking dish cover with oil and coat top with spice mixture

Cook for 35 mins in oven and serve with roasted veg

Share the love

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Digg
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Print

Chicken & Vegetable Stir-Fry

Written by lee on . Posted in Dinner, Recipe Book

Serves 4

  • 500gms diced chicken 
  • 2 TBS coconut oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 knob ginger sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, sliced
  • 2 green peppers, sliced
  • 1 red pepper, sliced
  • 1 yellow pepper, sliced
  • 1 orange pepper, sliced
  • 1 stick celery, sliced
  • 1 cup green beans, chopped
  • 1 head baby broccolini, chopped
  • 1 cup English spinach
  • 1 cup yellow squash, chopped
  • Celtic sea salt to taste
  • 1 TBS salt reduced wheat free tamari
  • 1 TBS tahini
  • ½ tsp. stevia

Brown onions and garlic in oil

Add chicken cook until no longer pink

Add vegetables and stir-fry until crisp

Add tahini and seasonings and tamari and stevia and mix

Cook with lid on for 10 mins on low heat

Serve

Share the love

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Digg
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Print

Meatloaf

Written by lee on . Posted in Dinner, Recipe Book

  • 500 gms ground beef
  • 1/2 cup minced celery
  • 1/2 cup minced onion
  • 1 TBS minced garlic
  • 1 whole egg
  • 1 TBS fresh rosemary
  • 1/2 tsp. Celtic sea salt

Topping:

  • 3 TBS tomato paste
  • 3 TBS water
  • 2 drops liquid stevia 

(Place all three ingredients into a small bowl and whisk to combine)

 

Preheat oven to 220 degrees Celsius

Crack eggs into a large mixing bowl

Add the onions, celery, garlic, rosemary & salt. Mix well

Add the ground beef to the mixture and stir well

Press mixture into a loaf pan and then spread the tomato topping over the meatloaf

Place in the oven for approx. 40 mins

Remove from oven and let it sit to retain juices

Share the love

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Digg
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Print

Curried Chicken

Written by lee on . Posted in Dinner, Recipe Book

  • 750 gms chicken diced 
  • 1 TBS coconut oil plus extra
  •  1 can coconut milk 
  • 2 TBS lemon juice
  • 4 yellow onions - thinly sliced
  • 4 large cloves garlic minced
  • 1 large tomato diced
  • 2 TBS raw grated ginger
  • 1 TBS whole cumin seeds
  • 2 tsp. ground coriander
  • 1 tsp. turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp. sea salt 
  • Freshly cracked pepper

In a large saucepan, heat coconut oil on medium heat

Add garlic, ginger and onions and sauté until browned

In the same pan, slide onion, garlic and ginger to one side and add more coconut oil if necessary to toast the cumin and coriander until they are browned

Mix all ingredients together in the pan and add chicken, turmeric, lemon juice, tomatoes, coconut milk, sea salt, and a few twists of freshly cracked pepper, stirring well

Cover and reduce heat to low, simmering for about 30 minutes

Share the love

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Plus
  • Pinterest
  • Digg
  • Email
  • RSS
  • Print

Tweets

Follow

Get every new post on this blog delivered to your Inbox.

Join other followers: