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Salmon Chowder

Written by lee on . Posted in Autumn, Blog, Blog Dinner, Blog Lunch, Candida Friendly, Dairy Free, Gluten Free, Heal Your Gut, Nutrient Rich, Organic, Seasonal, Spring, Sugar Free, Summer, Wheat Free, Winter, Yeast Free

salmon chowder

If you haven’t tried my salmon chowder recipe yet you’re in for a soFISHticated treat. Holy mackerel it’s good.

Bursting with flavour and anti-inflammatory fats, this creamy, hearty dish tastes just as good as if served in a restaurant, but being completely additive-free it’ll leave you feeling satisfied without the digestive storm aftermath.

Eating an anti-inflammatory diet can help reduce inflammation in the body and even reduce the symptoms of certain conditions that are either caused by or worsened by inflammation, such as heart disease, Parkinson’s disease, Crohn’s disease, asthma, and arthritis. Best of all, many anti-inflammatory foods are often classed as “superfoods” in that they are nutritionally dense and offer a number of additional benefits, including disease prevention, weight loss, and boosting energy levels.

Chow down on this chowder to experience the gut-healing effects of salmon, one of the best foods to consume for its anti-inflammatory properties. The Omega-3 fatty acids in salmon have been linked with protection against several gastrointestinal diseases, through their anti-inflammatory activity and their ability to boost healthy microorganisms in the gut. It's also a great skin booster to plump up skin cells and avoid any need for a plastic Sturgeon.

Regular consumption of oily fish that is high in omega-3s, such as salmon, anchovies and sardines can help combat the over-consumption of foods rich in omega-6, such as poultry, eggs, and most vegetable oils. In the West many of us have an improper balance of omega-6s to omega-3s, and this can lead to inflammation in the body (particularly the gut), causing a range of unpleasant digestive symptoms.

When choosing salmon look for:

  • Wild, troll-caught
  • Avoid salmon that shows signs of browning or bruising
  • If buying salmon whole look for: clear eyes, minimal bruising & firm flesh
  • Ask your fish monger if the salmon comes from a sustainable fishery (in many parts of the world, wild salmon populations are threatened)  
  • Don’t be put off by different shades of pink, as different species will naturally be lighter or darker

Some other anti-inflammatory foods you can include in your diet are turmeric, garlic, onions, cabbage, kale, spinach, flaxseed, and extra virgin olive oil. These give you the most value for your money from an anti-inflammatory perspective.

While you don’t need to eat them all at every meal, incorporating one or two anti-inflammatory foods into your diet each day will be a big help when it comes to relieving your digestive symptoms.

This Salmon Chowder recipe from my book Heal Your Gut, also contains turnips, an underutilised root vegetable loaded with vitamin K and omega-3s, making it a great choice when following an anti-inflammatory diet. The curry powder enhances the flavours in this dish and gives it a slight kick and earthiness. Research shows that when observing cultures where curry is a staple item, such as India, it has been noted that there are fewer instances of inflammation-based diseases and conditions.

So what are you waiting for? Try this simple Salmon Chowder just for the “halibut” and let me know if you love it as much as I do.

Salmon Chowder

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin coconut oil
  • 4 salmon fillets (skin and bones removed)
  • 1/2 onion, diced
  • 2 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 celery stalk, diced
  • 1/2 teaspoon curry powder
  • 1 litre (35 fl oz/4 cups) chicken stock (see page 146)
  • 2 turnips, peeled and cut into 2.5 cm (1 inch) cubes
  • 1 teaspoon dried parsley
  • 250 ml (9 fl oz/1 cup) additive-free coconut milk
  • Celtic sea salt and freshly cracked black pepper, to taste
  • fresh flat-leaf (Italian) parsley or micro parsley, to serve

Method

Melt half the coconut oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add the salmon and cook for 3 minutes on each side or until just cooked. Set-aside
until cool enough to handle, then flake into pieces.

Melt the remaining oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, celery and curry powder, and cook, stirring frequently, for 3–4 minutes or until the onion is translucent. Add the stock, turnip and parsley and cook, covered, for 20 minutes or until the turnip is soft.

Add the coconut milk and stir to combine, then remove from the heat and allow to cool slightly. Transfer to a food processor or blender with the flaked salmon and purée until smooth. (Alternatively, purée the soup before adding the fish.) Season to taste, garnish with fresh parsley and serve.

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Comments (2)

  • Beverley

    |

    Hi Lee
    I hate turnips..what other veg can I use? Can’t wait to try this
    Beverley

    Reply

    • lee

      |

      Sweet potato would be nice 🙂

      Reply

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